UK and Ireland

The UK and Ireland’s bid to host Euro 2028 is set to be unopposed.

In a statement on Friday, UEFA confirmed it received a request from the Italian Football Federation (FIGC) and the Turkish Football Federation (TFF) to merge their individual bids into one joint bid to host Euro 2032, leaving the UK and Ireland as the sole bidders to stage the 2028 tournament.

The statement read: “In 2021, UEFA initiated a bidding process for the hosting of two consecutive editions of its European Championship, in 2028 and 2032.

“TFF entered the process for both editions, while FIGC decided to bid only for the 2032 edition.

“A joint bid to host the 2028 edition has also been placed by five associations: England, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

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UK and Ireland 2028 bid stadium list revealed

“UEFA will now work with FIGC and TFF to ensure that the documentation to be submitted for their joint bid is compliant with the bidding requirements.

“If the joint bid does comply with such requirements, it will be submitted to the UEFA Executive Committee at the meeting scheduled on 10 October, where the appointments for 2028 and 2032 will be made.

“Decisions on venues and match schedules will be made at a later stage.”

The Italian federation said the decision to bid jointly with Turkey had been reached following a “complex and fruitful consultation process”.

FIGC president Gabriele Gravina said: “We are facing a historic turning point that aims to enhance continental football. Football wants to be an ideal bridge for sharing passions and emotions related to sport.”

The FIGC said that if the joint bid was deemed compliant, a decision on host venues would be postponed.

If the UK and Ireland bid is successful ten stadia across the five nations would host matches: Wembley, Tottenham Hotspur Stadium, the Etihad Stadium, Everton’s new Bramley-Moore Dock Stadium, Villa Park and St James’ Park in England, a redeveloped Casement Park in Belfast, the Dublin Arena in the Republic of Ireland, Hampden Park in Scotland and the Cardiff National Stadium in Wales.

“Our pioneering five-way partnership will deliver a record-breaking and unforgettable UEFA Euro,” Debbie Hewitt, chair of UK and Ireland bid, said in a statement when the final plan was submitted in April.

The bid has political support across England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Ireland, with a joint statement on behalf of the nations’ leaders in April saying they would be “honoured” to deliver the tournament.

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